Blast Mitigation Status of Police Crowd Management Ensembles

Category: Publication

Author: Desmoulin, G. T., Dionne, J.P.

Publication: White Paper, 2012.

Between 1992 and 2002, more U.S. citizens were wounded or killed from explosives within U.S. borders than all of the international terrorist incidents that occurred during this same time. Yet, according to some researchers, the U.S. healthcare system still considers terrorism an international affair and therefore lacks the knowledge of the public health impact after bombings. Kapur in 2005 and more recently Lerner (2007) published articles outlining the need for non-military terrorism preparedness and the resulting disaster response of civilian factions. These research groups state that criminal bombings utilizing homemade materials occur daily, nearly 5 times a day on average in the U.S.. Although the events of September 11, 2001 have significantly raised awareness of the management of blast injuries in the civilian healthcare community, these research groups still stress that additional explosion specific mass-casualty incidents should be prepared for by civilian disaster management teams, emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, emergency physicians, trauma surgeons, and critical care/burn specialists.

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Comparison of 3D Spinal Motions during Stair-climbing between Individuals With and Without Low Back Pain

Category: Publication

Author: Lee J., Desmoulin G. T., Khan A., Park E.

Publication: Gait & Posture. 2011(34): 222–226.

In spite of the importance of stair-climbing (SC) as an activity of daily living, 3D spinal motion during SC has not been investigated in association with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this research is to investigate the differences of the spinal motions during SC between an LBP group and a healthy control group, in order to provide insight into the LBP effect on the spinal motions. During two types of SC tests (single and double step SCs), we measured 3D angular motions (flexion/extension, lateral bending, and twist) of the pelvis, lumbar spine and thoracic spine using an inertial sensing-based, portable spinal motion measurement system. For the nine motion variables (i.e. three anatomical planes  three segments), range of motions (ROM) and movement patterns were compared to determine the differences between the two groups. It was found that the only variable having the p-value of a t-test lower than 0.05 was the flexion/extension of the lumbar spine in both SCs (i.e. the LBP group’s ROM < the control group’s ROM). Although the strength of this finding is limited due to the small number of subjects (i.e. 10 subjects for each group) and the small ROM differences between the groups, the comparison result of the t-test along with the motion pattern shows that the effect of LBP during SC may be localized to the lumbar spinal flexion/extension, making it an important measure to be considered in the rehabilitation and treatment of LBP patients.

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Spinal Intervention Efficacy on Correcting Cervical Vertebral Axes of Rotation and the Resulting Improvements in Pain, Disability and Psychsocial Measures

Category: Publication

Author: Desmoulin G. T., Szostek J. S., Khan A. H., Al-Ameri O. S., Hunter C. J., Bogduk N.

Publication: Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain, 2012, 20(1): 31-40.

Mean axes of rotation [MAR] of cervical joints are an effective measure of spine pathology. Khan Kinetic Treatment [KKT] is known to relieve symptoms, but its biomechanical effects have not been quantified. This study assesses KKT efficacy using MAR correction and its associated effects.

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Effectiveness of Slow Rate Practice Techniques

Category: Publication

Author: Desmoulin G. T., and Larkin T.

Publication: White Paper, 2012.

The purpose of this paper is for GTD Engineering’s Geoff Desmoulin (GTD) to give scientific insight into slow movement training techniques developed and tested by Target Focus Training’s (TFT) Tim Larkin. In doing so GTD helps validate, continually improves, and, further develops the scientific basis of TFT training methodology. It is understood that while this work has scientific merit it was not the purpose to have this work accepted by a scientific peer-review publication nor has it been submitted anywhere on that behalf.

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Biomechanical assessment of the connection between risk of wrist fracture and the dumbbell chest press exercise performed on an exercise ball.

Category: Publication

Author: Desmoulin G.T. and Rabinoff M.

Publication: Int. J. Forensic Engineering, Vol. 2, No. 4, 2015.

Multiple incidents of exercise balls bursting during a dumbbell chest press have been reported. This study quantified the dynamics of the dumbbell chest press performed on such balls and the force applied throughout the exercise cycle. To do so, a well-documented case was replicated using subjects of similar weight, background and athletic ability in the same dumbbell chest press motion. Subjects were instructed to perform repetitions on the exercise balls at both a self-selected pace and at maximal speed using various masses. Dynamic measurements were made to record ball loading, ball loading rate, ball compression, and kinematics of the subjects. Peak loads averaged 2084 N in the case of fast trials and 1815 N for self-selected speed trials. Biomechanical aspects of injury causation and the safe use of exercise balls are discussed throughout the products life cycle; from design and manufacturing to the conditioning professional and athlete end user.

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A Biomechanical Method for Reconstruction of Tumbling Trampoline Associated

Category: Publication

Author: Desmoulin G.T., Rabinoff M., Stolz B., and Gilbert M.

Publication: J of Forensic Biomechanics, 2014, 5(1): 101-7.

Rebound devices such as trampolines are associated with catastrophic spinal cord injuries. Cadaveric studies have reported thresholds for injuries that can be applied to the case of failed acrobatics such as backward somersaults. However, it remains unclear whether falls on rebound surfaces should be expected to cause neurological injuries in the majority of cases or only in unfortunate exceptions. The purpose of the current study is to demonstrate the risk of injury associated with a failed backflip performed on a rebound device such as a trampoline or tumbling trampoline.

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